Epilogue: Flow and Time Management

One of the most difficult aspects of public speaking is time management.  This is especially true for any presentation that depends on the audience’s skill level or allows them to ask questions at any time.  Sure, rehearsal gives you an idea of how long your presentation will last, but how smoothly will it go when the audience gets involved? Continue reading

Case Study: Managing Flow

Now that we have introduced the concept of flow, and two major tools to achieve it, let’s bring it all together with a practical example.  The following slides are taken from the Talking About Your Company segment of one of my business English seminars.  It’s designed for lower-intermediate-level English learners. Continue reading

Managing Flow Part I: Eliciting

Last week, I introduced the concept of keeping your audience in a state of flow by actively managing the difficulty of your seminars and classes.

Designing your presentation with your audience’s skill level in mind is a given.  Problems arise, however, when you can’t get accurate information regarding your audience or you simply misjudge the difficulty of your own material.

We all know the situation:  you start presenting and quickly realize that your material is too easy, and your audience’s attention is evaporating.  Or, on the other hand, it’s too difficult and the audience is filled with blank stares.  The worst thing to do is to plow on through your material, ignoring these cues.  Eliciting is the first step in resolving (or, better yet, preventing) this problem. Continue reading