Meet and Greet

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As I mentioned before, planning and rehearsing are critical for successful presentations.  There is, however,  one thing that you might have to do on the spot:  a meet and greet.

For those of you who do a lot of one-off seminars, you might not have a clue about your audience beforehand.  Yet, as previously discussed, tailoring your content to your audience is critical.  So dos this mean that we are at an impasse here?  Not at all. Continue reading

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Dress Rehearsal

So you’ve  been doing your presentation routine for a while now.  You’ve gotten used to your regular rotation of topics and can anticipate what the audience will be like for each one.  Your stomach is officially butterfly free. Continue reading

Three Ways to Customize Your Presentations

Image credit: Robert Frye

A while back, I wrote about adding value to your presentations.  Presentations should be treated like products and your audiences are the consumers.  One way to increase the value of a product is to customize it for the consumer.  If you have the opportunity to learn about your audience before you present, here are three ways to consider customizing your presentations: Continue reading

Managing Flow Part I: Eliciting

Last week, I introduced the concept of keeping your audience in a state of flow by actively managing the difficulty of your seminars and classes.

Designing your presentation with your audience’s skill level in mind is a given.  Problems arise, however, when you can’t get accurate information regarding your audience or you simply misjudge the difficulty of your own material.

We all know the situation:  you start presenting and quickly realize that your material is too easy, and your audience’s attention is evaporating.  Or, on the other hand, it’s too difficult and the audience is filled with blank stares.  The worst thing to do is to plow on through your material, ignoring these cues.  Eliciting is the first step in resolving (or, better yet, preventing) this problem. Continue reading

Who Is Your Customer?

Before answering this question, let’s take a look at a typical (yet highly simplified) supply chain:

From the perspective of the manufacturer, who are the customers in this diagram?  Many people go for the obvious answer:  the end users.  Indeed, down the line, they are customers that need to be served and satisfied.  Don’t forget, however, the manufacturer also has more immediate customers: the retailers.  They, after all, are buying products directly from the manufacturer to be resold to customers. Continue reading